Thursday, July 23, 2009

Gang Violence Seminar

Gang Violence Seminar

In September 2008, the RCMP held a gang violence seminar at UNBC. Approximately 100 people, from seniors to youth, attended this seminar. The RCMP organized and financed the event, while PG Sikh Youth helped promote the events in the community and in the media. PG Sikh Youth Society gave an honorium to the speakers and members were also the MCs for the event. Members also volunteered at the event to help people reach the seminar. Prominent speakers, Sgt. Baltej Singh Dhillon and Rob Rai from the lower mainland explained the reasons of gang violence and its effect on youth and families. They also described risk factors and signs of youth that are involved in gangs. The seminar was in both English and Punjabi and therefore both youth and seniors could understand and learn the information presented.

People who attended thought the seminar to be very informative. Parents, especially, felt that the speakers gave them a “wake-up” call and that it made them want to have better communication and a closer relationship with their younger children.

The PG Sikh Youth society would like to thank the speakers, who provided an upbeat attitude and enthusiasm in their presentation. We would also like to thank Cst. Gary Godwin who helped organize this seminar. We are also appreciative of the Punjabi Canadians Seniors Society that donated $600 toward this seminar.









PG Sikh Youth Members with Sgt. Baltej Singh Dhillon, Rob Rai and Balbinder Singh Deo (from left to right)




Sgt. Baltej Singh Dhillon




Rob Rai

Media Articles on Gang Violence Seminar
Here are some articles that appeared in the Prince George Citizen.



Seminar looks at gang issues

Written by FRANK PEEBLES

Citizen staff Wednesday, 01 October 2008



Indo-Canadian criminal gangs are a major problem in the Lower Mainland and the East Indian community of Prince George wants to keep it from happening here. This weekend a group of local Sikh youth joined with the RCMP to hold a gang awareness seminar in the Punjabi language. Communication barriers are what breed the development of gangs, organizers said."A lot of parents don't speak English, so they wouldn't go to an event where English was only spoken," said Manpreet Sidhu, 16, a member of the Prince George Sikh Youth Society. "But it is a big issue, it is starting to come up to Prince George, so we wanted to get kids and parents together and talk to them in a language they would understand, so it was half in English and half in Punjabi."The reason for the half-and-half approach, said Sidhu, exemplifies the very issue. In a great many Indo-Canadian homes the grandparents speak only Punjabi and the children speak only English, with parents caught somewhere in the middle. Also, she said, there can be very ingrained generational protocols that do not make for a good flow of communication. This can alienate the youth of the household, and effectively conceal any bad behaviours leading to gang involvement until it is too late."There are a lot of Indo-Canadian people getting killed, you see it on the news, and their families getting hurt," Sidhu said. "People were really worried about this in Prince George and the people are saying the same things now that they were saying 10 years ago in Surrey, so are we going to be in the same situation down the road? We want to stop it before it gets into a problem like Surrey has. Right now it is not that big a thing here, but it could get big, so we want to be proactive and tackle it now." Information session on gangs aimed at Sikh community



Written by Citizen staff Friday, 26 September 2008 GARY GODWIN



The city's Sikh community is being encouraged to attend an information session on criminal gangs.The session will be conducted almost entirely in Punjabi, said Prince George RCMP Cst. Gary Godwin, after Indo-Canadians were "noticeable by their absence" when a similar session in English was held in April for the city as a whole."We feel that was just because of the language barrier," said Godwin. The idea is to warn parents and youth about the tactics gangs use to recruit members."We don't have any Indo-Canadian gangs up here, it doesn't appear there's one forming, the idea's just to be proactive," Godwin said. "We just want to show them what the real side of gangs are about and how dangerous they can be."Being a gang member is not a good life to be caught up in, Godwin said."They may look like they have flashy cars and lots of money to spend but that's not the real gangs, the gangs are very controlling," he said. "The money goes to the leaders of the gang and you're in a regime and if you don't perform for that regime there are some dire consequences."





3 comments:

  1. these gang violence peeps need to calm down in my opinion. They're putting sikhism in a bad light. No wonder all the other peeps think WE are promoting violence. like wow.
    its like this. if canada was a big playground, in the other kid's(other canadian peeps)views we're the big bullies who are teaching their little brothers about how to slug a second graders head. i mean come on lets make sikhism look like the great religion it is.
    Darth vader

    ReplyDelete
  2. TEACHING THE VALUES OF PEACE

    By: Mike (Ali) Raccoon Eyes Kinney






    As a Cherokee Native American Activist and a former member of the Richmond California Violence Prevention Movement, I have seen close to 515 homicides in the City of Richmond from 2001 to the present.

    The declaration of a 'war on violence' by the Richmond city government was not the panacea, instead it failed miserably.

    I have often stated in town hall meetings and on television, the best way to win the 'war on violence' in Richmond is to 'TEACH THE VALUES OF PEACE'.

    In the killing fields of Richmond, most of the victims of homicides are youth or young adults. Teaching the values of peace begins with our youth and young adults. From a Native perspective, winning the war on violence begins in the home with a strong, spiritual belief and value system.

    We believe that Creator made all generations, past, present and those of the future, holy people. This is what our Elders teach us from the time we are born.

    Our families and Elders teach our young people that they must tear away the images and stereotypes that mainstream society has placed upon them as Native peoples.

    Violence and killing is not traditional in Native culture, it is a learned behavior from mainstream society.

    We teach our youths not to attack, punish or beat themselves up for crimes that they have never committed in regards to racism. Our Elders and families teach our young people to have good self-esteem, self-worth and self-value, for as the original holy people this was Creators plan.

    Native people know that it is both family and community responsibility to teach the values of peace to our young people.

    We teach our young people honesty and accountability concerning violence. It begins with accepting responsibility for self and acknowledging any past use of violence.

    Admitting any wrongdoing, communicating openly and truthfully to renounce the use of violence in the future places our youth on the right path. We place a heavy emphasis that all life is sacred.

    The final lesson in teaching the values of peace is quite simple. It is helping young people understand their relationship to others and all things in Creation.

    Be responsible for your role, act with compassion and respect, and remember ALL LIFE IS SACRED. Native culture is prevention!

    Mike (Ali) Raccoon Eyes Kinney

    ReplyDelete
  3. TEACHING THE VALUES OF PEACE

    By: Mike (Ali) Raccoon Eyes Kinney






    As a Cherokee Native American Activist and a former member of the Richmond California Violence Prevention Movement, I have seen close to 515 homicides in the City of Richmond from 2001 to the present.

    The declaration of a 'war on violence' by the Richmond city government was not the panacea, instead it failed miserably.

    I have often stated in town hall meetings and on television, the best way to win the 'war on violence' in Richmond is to 'TEACH THE VALUES OF PEACE'.

    In the killing fields of Richmond, most of the victims of homicides are youth or young adults. Teaching the values of peace begins with our youth and young adults. From a Native perspective, winning the war on violence begins in the home with a strong, spiritual belief and value system.

    We believe that Creator made all generations, past, present and those of the future, holy people. This is what our Elders teach us from the time we are born.

    Our families and Elders teach our young people that they must tear away the images and stereotypes that mainstream society has placed upon them as Native peoples.

    Violence and killing is not traditional in Native culture, it is a learned behavior from mainstream society.

    We teach our youths not to attack, punish or beat themselves up for crimes that they have never committed in regards to racism. Our Elders and families teach our young people to have good self-esteem, self-worth and self-value, for as the original holy people this was Creators plan.

    Native people know that it is both family and community responsibility to teach the values of peace to our young people.

    We teach our young people honesty and accountability concerning violence. It begins with accepting responsibility for self and acknowledging any past use of violence.

    Admitting any wrongdoing, communicating openly and truthfully to renounce the use of violence in the future places our youth on the right path. We place a heavy emphasis that all life is sacred.

    The final lesson in teaching the values of peace is quite simple. It is helping young people understand their relationship to others and all things in Creation.

    Be responsible for your role, act with compassion and respect, and remember ALL LIFE IS SACRED. Native culture is prevention!

    Mike (Ali) Raccoon Eyes Kinney

    ReplyDelete